You are here:
Home
About Us
News
Continuum: Framing Trans Lives in 21st Century Britain

Continuum: Framing Trans Lives in 21st Century Britain

Opening on Saturday 24 June, Continuum is one of the first large-scale group exhibitions in the UK dedicated to promoting trans art.

15 June 2017

Continuum: Framing Trans Lives in 21st Century Britain

Continuum will showcase the diversity of trans voices in 21st century Britain, with 14 artists from a variety of backgrounds, working across a range of artistic media.  The exhibition is part of the museum’s Never Going Underground season that explores the fight for LGBT+ rights.

Continuum is the first exhibition curated by Artmob, which was established to raise the profile of trans and gender variant artists in the UK.  Continuum focuses on the power of creativity to transform otherwise difficult and overlooked experiences and the ability of visual art to communicate, transform and connect.  As such, it moves away from the public scrutiny and sensationalism that surrounds trans people’s identities and bodies, and instead gets to the heart of what it is to be human.

Catherine O’Donnell, Programme Manager for the People’s History Museum, says, ‘The Never Going Underground season at the People’s History Museum has given LGBT+ communities the opportunity to tell, express and share their stories, and Continuum is no exception.  We are hugely supportive of the aims and ambitions of Artmob, which through art is communicating really powerful stories that will enable audiences to connect to the challenges and complexities encountered by the trans and gender variant community.’

According to Louis Bailey and Alex J Gardner – the co-founders of Artmob and the curators of Continuum, ‘For Continuum we want to present a range of voices that speak to diverse issues of trans existence – the political and social issues, the continuing evolution of how we inhabit our own skins, and the philosophical and psychological elements of inhabiting a world where we are seen as ‘other’.  It’s also a way of showing that we’re more than the sum of our (private) parts – we are as three-dimensional and ‘real’ as anyone else: we are all just human.’

Nick Askew’s portraits draw on interviews with people from the trans community in order to challenge the limited ways in which trans identities are presented by the media.
Mixed-media artist Louis Bailey draws on nature and his fascination with birds to highlight the beauty and magic of growth and change.
Juno Birch’s tongue-in-cheek drawings reveal the mental and physical processes of gender transition.
Photographer Jenö Davies highlights deeply-rooted practices which are powerful yet ultimately fragile and undermined.
Emma Frankland explores the menopause and HRT (hormone replacement therapy) through ritual and the making of ceramic pots.
Elizabeth Frost
has developed ‘Super Gender Land ‘97’ – a retro video game in which players take control of the lead trans character as they battle life’s challenges.
Alex J Gardner’s relief prints capture the philosophy and politics of trans (in)visibility and the influences and processes that underpin identity formations.
Sculptor Chris Hubley plays with notions of ‘otherness’ and ‘monstrosity’ in his representations and transformations of trans men’s genitals.
Samantha Scott-Kentell’s installation reveals the cyclical process of ‘creation’ vs ‘destruction’ that results from continually moving between two genders.
Dissatisfied with the ways that stories about trans people are told, Sydney Main turns to comic art as a means of creating new narratives about their life and community.
Vijay Patel’s paintings celebrate the richness and diversity of Indian culture and customs, which enable non-binary gender expression.
Harry Saxon’s
comic strips narrate his experiences of living in the UK as a Greek migrant and the frustrations of living in limbo as a trans man whose gender identity is not recognised by his home country.
JD Scott works with embroidery to explore the linguistic significance of the gender-neutral, honorific title ‘Mx’.
Performance artist Jak Soroka reclaims notions of shame through the documentation of private and public displays of gender and everyday bodily actions.

  • Continuum opens on Saturday 24 June, on display until Sunday 3 September.  Entry is free with a suggested donation of £3.
  • On Friday 23 June, 6.00pm – 8.00pm, you can join Artmob and PHM for the preview of Continuum.  This is a free event, which has a suggested donation of £5.

Accompanying events:

Sat 1 July
Continuum – Meet the Artists
Join us for a tour and a chance to meet some of the Continuum artists as they discuss their work and the exhibition, and answer your questions!  Part of SPARK, a brand new trans arts festival, raising trans-visibility in a creative way, in Manchester from 1-7 July.
Booking required via Eventbrite
In order to keep our events programme affordable to everyone, please make a donation
Suggested donation £3
1.00pm – 4.00pm

Fri 7 July
Gender in motion
Join Vijay Patel to explore your experiences of gender through animation.  Learn how to create a quick and easy stop-motion animation with a Smartphone using cut-outs, photographs and more!  Part of SPARK, a brand new trans arts festival, raising trans-visibility in a creative way, in Manchester from 1-7 July.
Suitable for all ages
Booking required via Eventbrite
In order to keep our events programme affordable to everyone, please make a donation
Suggested donation £3
1.00pm – 4.00pm

Fri 25 August
Continuum exhibition tour
Join Alex Gardner and Louis Bailey, curators of Continuum for a tour of the exhibition to learn more about the artists’ work and the creation of the show.
Suitable for adults and young people
Booking required via Eventbrite
In order to keep our events programme affordable to everyone, please make a donation
Suggested donation £3
11.00am – 12.00pm

Sun 27 August
Community and Identity – artist-led discussion with Jak Soroka
How do communities affect our sense of identity?  How does identity impact our relationship to community?  When does community strengthen our sense of self or self-expression?  Join Jak Soroka, one of the Continuum artists, for an artist-led discussion on queer communities – past, present and future.
Suitable for adults and young people
Booking required via Eventbrite
In order to keep our events programme affordable to everyone, please make a donation
Suggested donation £3
1.00pm – 3.00pm